Saturday, April 4, 2009

How do you interpret this?

1 Corinthians 14:33-35

For GOD is not a GOD of disorder but of peace. As in all the congregations of the saints, women should remain silent in the churches. They are not allowed to speak, but must be in submission, as the Law says. If they want to inquire about something, they should ask their own husbands at home, for it is disgraceful for a woman to speak in the church.

9 comments:

SLC said...

Hmmmmm. Thanks first of all for posting all three verses. The King James translation says, "For God is not the author of confusion", and the content of the chapters before and after these three verses generally refers to order in the Church; specifically the Church services.

It would be out of order for me to stand up in the midst of a service and ask a question about something I don't understand, no matter how well intentioned I may be, I'd still be wrong. Apparently the Corinthian church had experienced women asking questions at inappropriate moments during the service. In submission to God and their husbands it would be better for them to wait until they were home, and pose their question to their husband.

Today, many Bible studies are interactive and encourage questions from everyone as a way to create broader understanding, but never debate. But if someone that attended the midweek Bible study, asks the same questions during the Sunday morning message, they, male or female, should be instructed about the protocol of that congregation.

In 1 Corinthians 11, Paul said it was a shame for a woman to pray or prophesy with her head uncovered. I don't believe he would turn around and then silence women totally. I think the last verse of Chapter 14 sums it up best; Let all things be done decently and in order.
1 Corinthians 14:40 KJV

I know this is long so feel free to delete it.
Love you sis.
SLC

crochet lady said...

That's a tough one. There are verses in Timothy that are similar. I think there are several things to keep in mind - the times in which this was written, who it was written to, and how to apply this today.

Men's and women's roles were really defined pretty firmly in the age these verses were written. Also, these words were written to those in Corinth, a busy city with major Roman influence where women were often outspoken and could hold different important roles in their social structure.

So keeping those things in mind, what is God trying to say? Perhaps these verses were meant to specifically address some 'power' issues in their congregations there in Corinth. Although the words 'as in all the congregations of the saints' seem to stick out.

I have to lay these verses along side others where God says there is neither slave or free nor male or female, these are equal in God's sight. So if we are and if indeed the Gifts of the Holy Spirit are alive and active within Christians and we are all a part of the body of the Christ each functioning together to work as a whole. Women must have some roles in there somewhere.

I'm not sure how that all works within the church as far as male and female roles and if they should or shouldn't be defined as such. I guess we need to rely on the power of God's Spirit to Help us determine were we fit in all that.

I have seen such harm come when people are so rigid with scripture that women are basically degraded within the church and there are no active roles for them. People use the scripture to 'legally' tell others how to live. That's the Holy Spirit's job if you ask me. And ultimately, God looks at the heart of a person not the outward appearance or the legalistic forms of a religious life.

I try to live out what I read in God's word the best I can and pray for the Holy Spirits intervetion.

Well that's my two cents worth, sorry it was so long winded!
Jen

Thy Word Is A Lamp Unto My Feet said...

Hello there.

I totally agree with both SLC and Crochet Lady - the verses are to be interpreted within the context written and also taking into consideration the fact that it was written to a first century church living in a totally different culture.

As SLC said, there was to be order in the church and 'some' women were totally out of control - almost disruptive. Paul valued women - he referred to Priscilla and Aquila as his fellow workers in Christ. Perhaps the problem in Corinth arose due to liberation of women (somewhat) because they were no longer to be viewed as degrading, demeaning, old fashioned way that society once placed on them. Newly found freedom was taken to the extreme and order was needed.

Have a wonderful weekend!

A Free Spirit Butterfly said...

I want to thank you all for stopping by on this Beautiful Saturday. I love your "perspective's and interpretation." I am enjoying my journey through the Bible and switching back from my reading plan to the New Testament. I'm oftentimes rereading something that doesn't seem quite clear and then there are times when I read something that brings about an ephiphany. I love that I can blog with my Christian family and gain insight in those areas where a new Christian may be a little lost.

Love and hugs.

PAK ART said...

I do believe in a marriage relationship that God placed the husband as head of the home and spiritual leader and the wife as the helpmate - with both of them loving and respecting one another. The marriage relationship is supposed to be like Christs relationship with the Church - he is the groom, the church is the bride of Christ. So, in saying that I agree with all the above. There were problems in the church with probably some very vocal women taking things out of order. I believe the women were being instructed to speak with their husbands first, as heads of the home and as spiritual leaders, prior to speaking up at church. For those women who are not married to Christian men, I think it is appropriate to go to one of the Elders or pastor for guidance, questions about the service, questions about the message, etc. God did create man and women to work together, to accomplish His goal, that of bringing all to Christ.

CareyCarey said...

I agree with SLC, IMO, SLC has been around a few bible study groups. I noticed he referred back to 1 Corinthian 11.

I've found it to be a very unwise decision to take verse out of it's context. I've also found it wise to understand the person that wrote the book, and why he wrote it and when he wrote it. I try to look away from any negative interpretations that may be whispered my way.

CareyCarey said...

I couldn't leave this alone *smile*.

Questions about interpretation of the Bible is a slippery slope. I defer all questions of interpretation to my pastor. If I am to believe he is my leader than it's not up to me to interpret it. Now, if I have a "question" then it's like someone mentioned, I think it's wise to ask that question at the proper time. Not to debate your leader, pastor, ect., but for clarification.

Our Bible study is called lunch in the word (midday)

Stacye said...

SLC, said it best..."It would be out of order for me to stand up in the midst of a service and ask a question about something I don't understand, no matter how well intentioned I may be, I'd still be wrong. Apparently the Corinthian church had experienced women asking questions at inappropriate moments during the service. In submission to God and their husbands it would be better for them to wait until they were home, and pose their question to their husband."

Everything must be done in order and God didn't intend for women to be in the background or to be silenced. For everything there is a season and a purpose under the sun(SON).

Love Ya,
Stacye

Tea With Tiffany said...

:) I say we need to put this in context with the time.